Twitter Analytics by Jeffrey Marks

JEFF1023Maybe it’s just me or my degree in math, but I’ve always found numbers to be very helpful.

When I look at my marketing efforts, I find numbers important because it helps to tell me what is working for me and what is not working. I don’t want to put any more time into a marketing campaign when it’s not getting me readers or Facebook likes or whatever goal you have.

Numbers tell me what works and what doesn’t, but they don’t explain to me why they work. That’s where analytics come in. They help you to make decisions about what is working. IF a campaign is working well, then you should pay more attention to it. If it’s not working, then you’ll need to work on fixing it.

Twitter, which has long been a major promotional tool for me, has recently started showing us analytics. The first tool is the ability to look at the make-up of your followers. Given that multiple studies have shown that more women read than men, you’ll want to have more women followers. Right now, mine is skewed slightly towards women, 51-49%. This gives me a hint that perhaps to reach more readers, I need to cultivate more women followers on Twitter.

For the United States, you’ll see the breakdown of followers by state. It’s no surprise that Ohio is a big category for me, since I live here. California and Texas are also big followers. For overseas, the analytic tools will break the followers down by country. If you write about a particular part of the United States or write about a foreign country, you’ll want to work on upping the number of followers in that area.

The other set of tools available (on the other screen) is a list of favorites , replies, and retweets for each tweet that you’ve sent. The analytics will help you with this as they have options to show you all of the tweets, the best, the better and the rest. Scan the list and look for the tweets that have the most of each category. What did you do for these tweets that you didn’t do for others? Did you include hashtags (most authors don’t include these) or mention people via using the @ and their user name? Was the tweet a reply to someone or a retweet?

The tools also tell you if the reach of the tweet was greater than normal. This usually occurs when someone retweets your tweet. Be sure to see who has the greatest reach. I’ve had 20 people who share many of the same followers retweet something and have it register less of an effect than one person who has followers not inside the same circle as me.

You can also see who clicks through on the URL you’ve hopefully embedded in the tweet. Many of my tweets don’t get any clicks, which means either it’s time to retire them or fix the message. Others consistently get more clicks which tells me I’m doing something good.

Most of this analytics shown by Twitter is relatively new. So take the time to fine tune your message to the public. Not all tweets were created equal.

About Jeffrey

Jeffrey Marks was born in Georgetown, Ohio, the boyhood home of Ulysses S. Grant. Although he moved with his family at an early age, the family frequently told stories about Grant and the people of the small farming community.

At the age of twelve, he was introduced to the works of Agatha Christie via her short story collection, The Underdog and Other Stories. He finished all her books by proofINTENTTOSELLthe age of sixteen and had begun to collect mystery first editions.

After stints on the high school and college newspapers, he began to freelance. After numerous author profiles, he chose to chronicle the short but full life of mystery writer Craig Rice.

That biography (which came out in April 2001 as Who Was That Lady?) encouraged him to write mystery fiction. The Ambush of My Name is the first mystery novel by Marks to be published although he has several mystery short story anthologies on the market. He followed up with Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s and Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography.

His work has won a number of awards including the an Anthony in 2009 for his Anthony Boucher biography, Barnes and Noble Prize, and he has been nominated for an Edgar (MWA), an Agatha (Malice Domestic), a Maxwell award (DWAA), and an Anthony award (Bouchercon). Today, he writes from his home in Cincinnati, which he shares with his dogs.

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One thought on “Twitter Analytics by Jeffrey Marks

  1. Interesting–for sure!

    I am in a current sort of limbo, since we are in the process of moving from the rural Ozarks to a condo (five rooms!) in Fayetteville. EEK, how many books can I move? Currently have packed and then shelved over a thousand at the new condo.

    I have “known” Jeff on the Internet for years, own a couple of his books, already shelved in what will be my new office in Fayetteville.

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