An Interview with Liz Schulte

MeLiz Schulte is a fairly new acquaintance of mine, and I love what I see! I love her website, her tenacity and her sense of humor (let’s face it, all of us mystery buffs can be a little weird). I hope you enjoy “meeting” her here today and will rush right out and buy one of her books!

PJ: How long have you been writing?

LS: I have been officially writing novels since 2006, but my first book wasn’t published until 2010. However, I used to write short stories in junior high and high school.

PJ: At what point did you reach a place where you felt successful as a writer?

LS: I felt successful as a writer when complete strangers began to find me on social networks and tell me how much they loved my books. That always brightens a cloudy day.

PJ: Is the writing life what you expected when you started out? If not, how is it different?

LS: I don’t know that I really had any expectations when I started. I mostly took writing up again because my mother kept telling me I should write a book. Finally, I had a really good idea and just tried it. I had no idea where it would go, if anywhere, or what it would be like once I got there. I have recently become a full time writer. It is a little different than I thought it would be. I thought I would be swimming in extra time, but I seem to be just as busy as I was before.

PJ: The general public seems to think authors are relatively wealthy. Without prying too much, has your writing income lived up to expectations?

LS: My writing income has exceeded my expectations, no doubt. I never really believed I would be able to make a living just doing what I love. I am very fortunate to be in that position now. I know a lot of great authors who also have to have day jobs.

PJ: Early on, so much focus is given to getting published. Now that you’re published, how has your focus changed?

LS: My focus is always on my next book. I want each book I put out to show my growth as an author and to engage the readers.

PJ: How long did it take you to get published the first time?

 LS: I published my first book three years after I wrote it.

PJ: Would you do anything differently if you had it to do over again?

LS: Yes! I would have self-published it and not waited so long.

PJ: Writing new material, rewriting, submitting new work, waiting, promoting published work…the list is large. How do you manage to divvy up your time to give adequate attention to all needed areas?

LSTime management is definitely the hardest part of being a writer. Being a writer is like having three separate jobs. You have to write the book (job 1), edit the book (job 2), and then you have to market the book (job 3). I don’t know that there is a perfect formula for handling this. Writing is always my top priority so I set word count goals for myself every day and once I meet those, I will work on the other two jobs as needed.

PJ: What is the single most exciting thing that’s happened to you as a writer?

LS: It is pretty hard to choose only one thing. I think being named as one of Apple iBooks Breakout Authors in the UK was pretty exciting.

PJ: What is the single most disappointing thing that happened to you as a writer?

LS: I honestly can’t think of anything. There are always disappointments in life and careers, but I never let them get me down or stay with me. When I have a setback, I push forward to better the next time.

PJ: What’s the most memorable thing (good or bad) that’s happened to you while promoting your work?

LS: I went to a writing conference in Florida. A fan of mine who lived in Minnesota wasn’t able to come, but her parents were vacationing there so they came by to meet me and get pictures for their daughter. I thought that was pretty great.

PJ: With more books being released each month now than ever before, what do you believe sets your work apart from the others?

LS: I think it is the same things that set books apart before. You need an eye-catching cover and a great jacket copy.

PJ: What would you like to share with writers who haven’t reached the point of publication yet?

LS: Don’t get discouraged and keep trying. The market is evolving and always changing. If you can’t find a publisher that works for you, then there is always self-publishing. If you want it bad enough, you can take control of your career and make it happen.

PJ: What area of book promotion is the most challenging to you?

LS: It is pretty easy for an area of promotion to become over-saturated. So I think the most challenging part of promotion is constantly finding new avenues to meet and engage readers.

Give us a list of your published titles in chronological or series order:

Dark Corner (The Ella Reynolds Series)- 2011

Liz - Easybakecoven (2)Secrets (The Guardian Trilogy Book 1)- 2011

Choices (The Guardian Trilogy Book 2)- 2012

Consequences (The Guardian Trilogy Book 3)- 2012theninthfloor2 (1)

Dark Passing (The Ella Reynolds Series)- 2012

Easy Bake Coven (Book 1)- 2013

Hungry, Hungry, Hoodoo (Book 2)- 2013

The Ninth Floor– 2013

PJ: Share with us an elevator pitch (no more than 30 seconds) of your latest title:

The ninth floor of St. Michael’s Hospital was shut off to the public, staff, and administrators in 1984. The doors were welded and chained shut, the stop was removed from the elevators, and the no one talked about what happened there—ever.

Ryan Sterling knew her life was going to change forever the day she found out her aunt needed a transplant, and she agreed to return to a home she never wanted to see again. Spending the vast majority of her time in St. Michael’s hospital, she soon notices peculiarities: her aunt’s roommate rants about evil, the nurses whisper about hauntings, and no one will tell her why the ninth floor is locked. Ryan thinks all the rumors are ridiculous until two nurses die right after she speaks with them about the floor in question.

Ryan never wanted to go home again, now she may never leave.

Where can we buy it?

Amazon, iBooks, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Kobo, and Sony.

Thanks for visiting with us Liz! I hope you’ve found some new readers here and I know I’m looking forward to seeing what your next books will be!

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One thought on “An Interview with Liz Schulte

  1. The Ninth Floor sounds like one not to be missed. Enjoyed the interview and suggested several friends read it.

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