A Cozy Mystery with Cupid and St. Valentine by Connie Knight

Cupid,-god-of-love“I don’t understand why Cupid was chosen to represent Valentine’s Day. When I think about romance, the last thing on my mind is a short chubby toddler coming at me with a weapon.”

                                                                        —Author Unknown, quoted by Donna Diegel

 

 

Valentine’s Day celebrates early Christian saints of that name. Instead of promoting romance, Valentinus performed weddings that were forbidden, and ministered to Christians. He was a martyr who suffered prison and execution. Somehow, in the Middle Ages, Valentine’s Day became a festival of romantic love and Cupid, a Greek and Roman god of desire, became associated with it. Paintings and statues depicted him; later, flowers, cards, and chocolate candy became gifts of romance.

Today, Valentine’s Day is feverishly marketed with romantic cards and humorous ones popping up everywhere. Love songs may touch upon romance seriously or not. I remember one by Connie Francis. The lyrics start, “Stupid Cupid, you’re a real mean guy, I’d like to clip your wings so you can’t fly.” That song was a hit. Of course, romance is often part of a novel’s plot. In cozy mysteries, romance is almost always important—unless the amateur sleuth is elderly like Miss Marple, pompous like Hercule Poirot, or a priest like Father Brown.

Romance between the cozy mystery’s amateur sleuth and a local police officer happens pretty often. The setting is a small town, an English manor, an area like a fishing village or a Texas ranch. Both my novels, the Caroline Hargrove Hamilton Mystery Series, are set in DeWitt County near San Antonio, in Yorktown and in the country—mostly ranches. Couples appear in both books, although St. Valentine’s influence is more important than Cupid’s bow and arrow.

In Cemetery Whites, the first novel, Caroline Hargrove Hamilton moves from Houston to Yorktown. Her husband died in a car accident andCemetery Whites Cover her life has disintegrated. She hopes to reshape it with her father’s family, and her old friend and cousin Janet welcomes her with open arms. They drive around the country roads one day and visit the family cemetery where they find a dead man and call the police. Constable Bob Bennett enjoys meeting Caroline. St. Valentine, so to speak, presents him as a handsome man who takes good care of the people in his precinct. Other romances include one from the old days discovered in genealogy records.

Romantic Cupid might turn up at Billie’s Bar-B-Que where Caroline and her cousins go for dinner, dancing, and playing pool. Bob Bennett turns up too, and by the end of the book, he and Caroline are romantically involved at his ranch and her house in Yorktown.

My second novel, Chances Choices Changes Death, involves several couples falling in love. The main plot is the murder of Myra Cade and Chances Changes Choices Death Cover (1)the solution of that homicide, but since the book is a cozy mystery, I’ve created subplots and characters with Western romance rather than grim suspense. Myra is a single mother looking for paternal support for her eight-year-old son. She was long in love with Danny Harrell, but they broke up and she had an affair with Danny’s best friend Richard Hurst and then a short fling with sleazy dude Brian Atkins. Did one of them stab Myra to death? Cupid took Myra on a date with Brian. A bad decision.

St. Valentine had better influence on Donny Harrell who spent the summer working on Robinson Ranch. Young Cathy Robinson fell in love with him, and her guest Chris took a liking to Donny’s twin brother Danny—but Danny didn’t fall in love with anyone anymore. His old friend Richard Hurst turned up and fell in love with Dora, Brian Atkins’ cousin’s widow. She loved him, too. They all got engaged, except Danny and Chris. The book ends at Billie’s Bar-B-Que with the wedding of a long-engaged couple, Martha McNair and Allen Boyce from San Antonio. And guess what happens when Bob and Caroline go home after the wedding reception? Bob asks a question, and Caroline says yes. That’s the start of Cozy Mystery No. 3.

 

 

connie10Connie Knight’s interest in Texas history is reflected in Cemetery Whites. Murders in 1875 and 2010 are solved, with the detective’s family history unraveling to reveal information. Knight’s hobby of gardening produced the title Cemetery Whites. The victim’s body is found sprawled in a patch of white irises in an old family cemetery. The flowers with that name still exist today, at old homesteads and in current gardens, including Connie Knight’s.

Connie Knight now lives in Houston and has just finished a second mystery, Chances Choices Changes Death, a sequel to Cemetery Whites. She is now working on her third mystery novel in the Caroline Hargrove Hamilton Mystery series.

https://www.connieknightmysterywriter.com/blog/

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/connieknightauthor?ref=br_tf

Twitter @conniejs59

Buy links:

Chances Choices Changes Death

Cemetery Whites

 

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Five-legged frogs, pregnant fifty-year-olds, and centenarians on longevity drugs, plus a murder or two—

Author Betty Jean Craige

Author Betty Jean Craige

Five-legged frogs, pregnant fifty-year-olds, and centenarians on longevity drugs, plus a murder or two—that’s what I wrote about in my new murder mystery Downstream.

 

According to publisher Black Opal Books, my novel is a “cozy mystery” in that both the crime and the detection take place in a nice, small community where all the characters know each other. The reader does not witness the murder itself, so he or she must use his or her brains to figure out who the murderer is on the basis of the information provided. I like this kind of novel because I prefer solving crimes to watching them transpire.

 

Downstream, which I’d originally called “We All Live Downstream,” focuses on the medication of our DOWNSTREAM coverplanet. The drugs that some of us take to improve our health get into everybody’s water supply—I won’t say how—and then into the bodies of others who don’t have prescriptions for them. So humans of all ages, and birds, bees, bears, frogs, and fish, all take estrogen, anti-depressants, and tranquilizers. Some of the fish get happy, some of the frogs develop five legs. Some of the humans, with the help of their husbands, get pregnant after menopause.

 

The conflict in 2015 between proponents of the longevity drug Senextra and defenders of the natural environment happens in a town I called Witherston in mountainous north Georgia. It is here, in southern Appalachia, that two centuries ago white settlers stole gold and land from the Cherokees in the 1828 Georgia Gold Rush and the 1830s Land Lotteries, and then in 1838-39 force-marched them to Indian Territory (in present-day Oklahoma) on the “Trail of Tears.” Those events of the early nineteenth century form the historical context of the environmentalists’ fight against the pharmaceutical industry.

 

Here’s the situation. At the celebration of his hundredth birthday, local billionaire Francis Hearty Withers announces to the people gathered on the front lawn of Witherston Baptist Church that he has finalized his will. In it he bequeaths $1 billion to the municipality of Witherston and another $1 billion to be divided up equally among the town’s 4,000 residents—in recognition of their support of a Senextra pharmaceutical factory. Senextra is a drug that enables individuals to lead healthy lives well into their second century. The group listening to the geezer do not all applaud. One person carries a sign that says SENEXTRA VIOLATES MOTHER NATURE. Another, KEEP SENEXTRA OUT OF OUR SYSTEM. A third, WE DON’T NEED MORE OLD MEN. Withers flies into a rage. He vows to change his will and disinherit the community. Two days later he is found dead.

 

Detective Mev Arroyo begins the investigation. But she has a health issue of her own, so she allows her fourteen-year-old mischievous twin boys, Jaime and Jorge, to do much of the detective work. The boys pore over old documents, interview suspects, and provoke the killer into revealing himself.

 

I’ve been told that all the characters in Downstream are “quirky. I reply that I view them as normal.

###

Dr. Craige has published books in the fields of Spanish poetry, modern literature, history of ideas, politics, ecology, and art.  She is a scholar, a translator, a teacher, and a novelist.

 

 

An interview with Susan Furlong-Bolliger

Susan Furlong-Bolliger

Susan Furlong-Bolliger

Lucy Arlington was originally conceived by the writing team of Ellery Adams and Sylvia May, two friends who collaborated on an idea that became A Novel Idea Mystery Series. Together, the duo penned the first three books in the series: Buried in A Book, Every Trick in the Book, and Books, Cooks, and Crooks. As time passed and their personal writing workload grew, the two decided to pass the baton to another writer: Susan Furlong. In addition to writing as Lucy Arlington, Susan Furlong is the author of Peaches and Scream, the first book of The Georgia Peach Mysteries, releasing in July of 2015. To learn more about Susan, visit her website at www.susanfurlong.com

 

PJ: How long have you been writing?

Susan: I’ve been working as a professional writer for over twenty years, mostly as a contracted academic writer and a ghost writer. My first piece of published fiction was a short mystery with Untreed Reads Publishing.

 

PJ: At what point did you reach a place where you felt successful as a writer?

Susan: The first time someone, other than family, said they read my work and enjoyed it.

 

PJ: Is the writing life what you expected when you started out? If not, how is it different?

Susan: Yes and no. I’ve always understood that writing takes discipline and a constant effort toward self-improvement. However, I underestimated how much juggling is involved between writing and promotion.

 

PJ: The general public seems to think authors are relatively wealthy. Without prying too much, has your writing income lived up to expectations?

Susan: Yes. But perhaps that’s because I have realistic expectations. With that said, I don’t make enough money to support a family—especially not my family. (We have four kids who love to eat … a lot.)

 

PJ: Early on, so much focus is given to getting published. Now that you’re published, how has your focus changed?

Susan: My focus has shifted to writing my best possible novels and making my deadlines on time. I’m also working hard to promote my new books so my contracts will be renewed and I can keep writing more books in each series.

 

PJ: How long did it take you to get published the first time?

Susan: My first short story was accepted on the initial submission. I was shocked and really pleased. On the flip side, my first novel took over three years to find a publisher.

 

PJ: Writing new material, rewriting, submitting new work, waiting, promoting published work…the list is large. How do you manage to divvy up your time to give adequate attention to all needed areas?

Susan: I make a list of monthly goals, weekly goals and a task list for every day. We still have children at home, so first priority goes to family. For that reason, I do end up working a lot of late nights and almost every weekend. Actually, I probably don’t juggle everything too well, but I just try to keep my priorities straight: family first, then work. Except when I’m approaching a deadline. Then things tend to go crazy. The house turns into a disaster, laundry piles up, and we eat a lot of take-out food…

 

PJ: What is the single most exciting thing that’s happened to you as a writer?

Susan: Hands down, the most exciting thing was receiving an offer of representation from my agent. I knew she had good connections, great business sense, a reputation for honesty, and could help me achieve my goals. I’m extremely fortunate to have her on my side.

 

PJ: What’s the single most disappointing thing that happened to you as a writer?

Susan: When pursuing publication, every rejection letter is a disappointment. Many editors deliver professional rejections, mostly form-letters, and some with handwritten suggestions or words of encouragement. Once, however, I received a particularly harsh rejection letter from an editor who told me, very blatantly, that my work annoyed the crap out of her. It really knocked me back for a few days. I was tempted to delete her email into oblivion, but instead I kept it and reread it a few days later. This time, her comments prompted me to take another look at my submission. I decided to do some rewriting, tone down some scenes, and submit to a different editor. That editor accepted it right away. Then that book led to another and another and … here I am! So, in retrospect, that editor did me a huge favor.

 

PJ: What is the most memorable thing (good or bad) that’s happened to you while promoting your work?

Susan: Once, after an author talk at a local library, a teenager approached and asked how to become a writer. We sat and talked for a long time about what she liked to write as well as her goals and dreams of becoming a published author. She’s in college now, working on staff for her university’s newspaper. We still stay in contact.

 

PJ: With more books being released each month now than ever before, what do you believe sets your work apart from the others?

Susan: I like to think my strength is in character development. I mostly enjoy writing about every day, ordinary people who find themselves caught up in extraordinary circumstances. I hope my characters resonate with readers.

 

PJ: What do you feel is your most effective tool for promoting your published work?

Susan: Locally, I give library talks and conduct signings. Whenever I meet a new reader, I always ask if they want to sign-up to receive email alerts for my next release. This has been an effective way for me to build a reader base and personally keep in touch with readers.

On-line, I find that Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads are helpful tools for connecting with readers. I also participate in several mystery-based Facebook groups and Yahoo forums.

 

PJ: What area of book promotion is the most challenging to you?

Susan: Cold calls to bookstores. Just this week, I made several calls to area Barnes and Noble stores to set up signings for my next release. My fingers actually shook when I dialed the numbers. (I really, really have to build myself up to make that initial call.) Then, when a couple stores said yes, I was elated … for about ten seconds, then I realized that I’d just scheduled myself for a public appearance, which also makes me a little nervous.

 

PJ: Do you have a local independent bookseller you’d like to mention?

Susan: Absolutely! A huge shout out to the wonderful people at Book World of Danville, Illinois, and the Jane Addams Bookshop in Champaign, Illinois.

 

PJ: Share with us an elevator pitch (no more than 30 seconds) of your latest title:

Susan: *Deep Breath* If you’d enjoy escaping to a quaint mountain village where the people are gracious, the food is southern delish, and books are a way of life, then come to Inspiration Valley, North Carolina, and spend your days with literary agent Lila Wilkins and her quirky team of co-workers at Novel Idea Literary Agency as they discover new writing talent, plan extraordinary author events and sometimes finds themselves facing down a few real-life mysteries. *Whew!*

 

PJ: Where can we buy it?

Susan: You’ll be able find PLAYED BY THE BOOK by Lucy Arlington on the shelf of  your local bookstore and library, or on-line at Amazon, Played by the BookBarnes and Noble, Walmart, Powell’s or just about anywhere else. It’s currently available for preorder here:

Barnes and Noble/ BN.com: http://tinyurl.com/m38hkf5

Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/mnb7lqc

 

PJ: What’s the last thing you would like to share with us that nobody knows about you and your work?

Susan: I can’t write without eating candy. It’s a horrible habit. I rotate between mini Tootsie Rolls, Jolly Ranchers, Twizzlers and Tootsie Roll Pops. Sometimes, after a particularly difficult scene, I find a couple dozen wrappers on my desk and I don’t even remember eating the candy!

Cozy Food and other delights by Nancy Lynn Jarvis

CNNIMG_4957-1“I know her, and her. Oh, I know her. Oh, I love her books, and hers, too.”

 

It may seem like a strange way for a woman looking at a cookbook to react, but it isn’t, really. When people turn “Cozy Food: 128 Cozy Mystery Writers Share Their Favorite Recipes” over and start reading the back cover—which is a top-to-bottom list of all the contributors to the cookbook—that’s often the response I hear. That’s because “Cozy Food” isn’t only about recipes; it’s a who’s who of cozy mystery writers.

 

But let’s talk about the recipes for a minute. Because the cookbook features an international group of writers, recipes come from all over the world. Although most recipes are from the present day, one of multiple-time Agatha Award nominee Kaye George’s series is set in the time of Neanderthals so she submitted a recipe for mammoth meat jerky to feed a tribe (and a modified version for modern humans who have to settle for using beef.) Amy Myers included the in-verse version of The Poet’s Recipe for Salad from her Victorian Master Chef series. If you want a proper Salmagundy recipe from the table of a twentieth century British aristocrat, Judith Cutler contributed one.

 

If your culinary skill set involves opening a few boxes of mixes and dumping them in a bowl, there’s Susan Furlong Bollinger’s Chocolate Dump Cake. If you lean more to gourmet cooking, try Sally Berneathy’s (aka Sally Carleen, Sally Steward, and Sara Garrett) Triple Chocolate Mousse Cake. If you’re looking to make something fun with your kids or grandkids there’s Margaret Grace’s (aka Camille Minichino) No Bake Mini “Hamburger” Cookies. And Sparkle Abbey and Laurie Cass submitted several pet treat recipes lest we forgot our favorite four legged-detective assistants who so often grace the pages of cozy mysteries.

 

Because Elaine Orr’s has had cooking disasters in her personal life, she asked her friend Leigh Michaels, writer of over one-hundred regency romances and two cookbooks, if she could borrow a couple of muffin recipes for “Cozy Food.” Looking for comfort food? Try new Anthony Award winner Catriona McPhearson’s the tastiest Mac you ever did Cheese. Wishing you were in Hawaii? Cindy Sample offers you a Tikki Goddess. Vegetarian? Check. Vegan? Check. Gluten intolerant? Check. Insane about chocolate? Huge check. There’s a new favorite recipe for everyone in “Cozy Food.”

 

And then are those 128 authors. (129 actually, I forgot to count me.) They’ve submitted biographies written with the same wit and entertainment value found in their books. Recipes, authors, bios, and book buying links are all round-robined so you can see what your favorite character likes to cook or find a great recipe and track down the author who put it in the books, Any way you go, you’re sure to find fabulous recipes for all occasions and tastes and your next new favorite cozy mystery writer to read.

 

P.S. Don’t miss the outtakes pages where writer comments that didn’t fit elsewhere but where too funny to consign to the trash bin found a home.Front-Cover-Small

 

 

 

You can find Cozy Food and see Nancy’s other books on my Amazon Author Page here.

 

Read opening chapters from all the books at http://www.goodreadmysteries.com  and say “Hi” at Goodreads

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2918242.Nancy_Lynn_Jarvis

and Facebook

http://www.facebook.com/ReganMcHenryRealEstateMysteries?ref=ts

An interview with Dr. Betty Jean Craige

Dr. Betty Jean Craige

Dr. Betty Jean Craige

Dr. Craige has published books in the fields of Spanish poetry, modern literature, history of ideas, politics, ecology, and art.  She is a scholar, a translator, a teacher, and a novelist.

 

 

PJ: How long have you been writing?

 

BJ: I started translating Spanish poetry and writing scholarly books in 1973 when I came to the University of Georgia as an instructor. I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t working on a book. My first non-scholarly book was Conversations with Cosmo: At Home with an African Gray Parrot (2010). I also had loads of fun for two years writing a column in our local newspaper titled “Cosmo Talks” about animal cognition and communication.

 

 

PJ: At what point did you reach a place where you felt successful as a writer?

 

BJ: I never made money as a scholarly writer, but I still felt that I was a successful scholar. However, not until I published Conversations with Cosmo did I realize I was “a writer.”

Downstream is my first novel. When Black Opal Books accepted it for publication, I felt I could be a successful writer.28451-026 (ZF-10527-14196-1-005)

 

 

PJ: Is the writing life what you expected when you started out? If not, how is it different?

 

BJ: I am retired from the University of Georgia. Although I am on several boards of non-profit organizations, I spend every spare minute writing my mysteries now. Writing is what I love to do best.

 

 

PJ: The general public seems to think authors are relatively wealthy. Without prying too much, has your writing income lived up to expectations?

 

BJ: As yet, I don’t have a writing income. I am 68 years old. I have published 17 books, but Downstream is my first novel.

 

 

PJ: Early on, so much focus is given to getting published. Now that you’re published, how has your focus changed?

 

BJ: I just want to devote whatever time I have left in my life to writing.

 

 

PJ: How long did it take you to get published the first time?

 

BJ: I never had trouble finding a publisher.

 

 

PJ: Would you do anything differently if you had it to do over again?  

 

BJ No.

 

 

PJ: Writing new material, rewriting, submitting new work, waiting, promoting published work…the list is large. How do you manage to divvy up your time to give adequate attention to all needed areas?

 

BJ: I would rather write than promote what is already in print.

 

 

PJ: What is the single most exciting thing that’s happened to you as a writer?

 

BJ: I was executive producer, producer, and co-writer of a documentary titled Alvar: His Vision and His Art. It won first place in “Short Documentaries” at the Indie Gathering Film Festival in 2006. That was very exciting.

 

 

 

PJ: With more books being released each month now than ever before, what do you believe sets your work apart from the others?

 

BJ: My mystery is set in North Georgia, and it’s about the pharmaceutical pollution of our environment. Its setting and its theme set it apart from other mysteries.

 

 

PJ: What would you like to share with writers who haven’t reached the point of publication yet?

 

BJ: Figure out what you have to share with the world and write about it. .

 

 

PJ: What do you feel is your most effective tool for promoting your published work?

 

BJ: Radio interviews.

 

 

PJ: What area of book promotion is the most challenging to you?

 

BJ: The whole idea of promoting myself. I would rather talk about ideas, the ideas in my book.

 

 

PJ: Give us a list of your published titles in chronological or series order:

 

Authored Books

Lorca’s Poet in New York: The Fall into Consciousness.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1977

Literary Relativity.  Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 1982

Reconnection: Dualism to Holism in Literary Study.  Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1988  (cloth and paper)  Winner of     Frederic W. Ness Award

Laying the Ladder Down: The Emergence of Cultural Holism.  Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1992.  (cloth and paper)     Winner of Georgia Author of the Year for Non-fiction

American Patriotism in a Global Society.  SUNY Series in Global Politics.  Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996 (cloth     and paper)

Eugene Odum: Ecosystem Ecologist and Environmentalist.  Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2001. (paper edition, 2002)

Conversations with Cosmo: At Home with an African Grey Parrot. Santa Fe: Sherman Asher Publishing, 2010. Foreword Reviews     Book of the Year Silver Award (Category Pets) (2011)

            Conversations with Cosmo: At Home with an African Grey Parrot. Red Planet Audiobooks, 2010

Parola di Papagallo (Italian translation of Conversations with Cosmo). Mediterranee, 2013

We All Live Downstream. Black Opal Books, 2014

 

 

DOWNSTREAM coverPJ: Share with us an elevator pitch (no more than 30 seconds) of your latest title:

 

At the celebration of his hundredth birthday, local billionaire Francis Hearty Withers announces to the people gathered on the front lawn of Witherston Baptist Church that he has finalized his will. In it he bequeaths $1 billion to his north Georgia hometown of Witherston and another $1 billion to be divided up equally among the town’s 4,000 residents—in recognition of their support of a Senextra pharmaceutical factory. Senextra is a drug that enables individuals to lead healthy lives well into their second century, but it has some unanticipated consequences.  Downstream, published by Black Opal Books, is Betty Jean Craige’s first novel. Betty Jean Craige is retired from the University of Georgia, where she was a professor of Comparative Literature.

 

 

PJ: Where can we buy it?

 

BJ Barnes & Noble, your local bookstore and online booksellers.

 

 

PJ: What last thing would you like to share with us that nobody knows about you and your work?  

 

BJ: I am an environmentalist who loves writing cozy mysteries.

 

Selling Your Novel to Readers – A Malice Domestic Report by Catherine Dilts

CatherineDilts_authorphoto_2-blog

 

When I attended the traditional mystery convention Malice Domestic this May, I had to overcome my reluctance to push my book. I’m an introvert, with a wide streak of shy. Schmoozing with strangers is my idea of torture.

Many authors seem to thrive on social media and self-promotion. Not me. My career path never even veered close to sales. That alien territory is fraught with rejection. I will admit I have sold quite a few Girl Scout cookies in my day, but seriously, those Thin Mints sell themselves.

Before my book came out, I did some research on book promotion. I hoped to discover a magic formula for what worked and what didn’t. There is no formula. Whether your novel is traditionally published, like mine, or indie, the correct approach to selling that book is as individual as the author. All promotion involves time, effort, and a bit of luck.

 

Here are some helpful hints I picked up on my journey:

  1. Don’t wear heels if you’re a sneakers kind of person. Find what you’re comfortable with, and don’t force yourself to spend time on promotional 05-01-14_sign-blogefforts you really hate. In my case, with a demanding day job, time is very limited. I focus my energy on my website and blog, Goodreads, and a few carefully selected in-person events.
  2. Not everyone likes Thin Mints. Don’t take rejection of your book personally. Focus on selling to your audience. At a book event, a woman glanced at the cover of my murder mystery, and declared she never read anything negative. Ouch! I smiled and nodded as I considered creative ways to do away with rude people. In a fictional manner, of course. I’ve had plenty more people tell me they love mysteries. There’s a market!
  3. Readers want you to succeed. The most important thing I learned at Malice Domestic is that readers have voracious appetites for fiction, and are excited to make new discoveries.
  4. Can you make a career off one novel? Harper Lee did it with To Kill A Mockingbird. But I’ve seen more success among authors, in any genre, who keep the good stories coming.
  5. Don’t stop writing because you’re promoting your new release. Keep working on your next story!

Conferences are good places to gain exposure to potential readers. I went to Malice Domestic because the focus is on the traditional mystery, cozies, and amateur sleuth novels. The conference offered authors multiple opportunities to pitch their novels to readers of murder mysteries.

The first morning, I sat in on Malice-Go-Round, an intense session where authors circulate around the room giving two-minute pitches at dozens of tables. I congratulated myself for not signing up for the frenetic event. I would have been in a straight jacket by the end.

Then the woman sitting next to me leaned over and said, “I can go home now.”

I needed clarification. She explained that this was what she came for every year. She was kidding about leaving. She would stay the entire weekend, but Malice-Go-Round was the highlight. I noticed readers scribbling notes as authors gave their two-minute pitches. People were making purchasing decisions, some for libraries.

I did sign up for the New Author Breakfast. Dozens of authors gave timed pitches to the entire room. I was still a nervous wreck, but at least it was over quickly. A hint to new authors – try to sit near an exit for that last minute dash to the facilities for cases of nervous tummy. Just sayin’.

The panel was where I really hit my stride. The focus was on my novel and my writing process, not me. I wasn’t alone. Three other authors participated in a panel on the topic of regional settings. The audience was lively, and seemed eager to find a new series or author.

Lessons learned?

  • Find the promotional methods that work for you.
  • Focus on your audience.
  • Feed your readers’ appetites with new stories.

 

You might have to step out of your comfort zone to reach your readers. That doesn’t mean you need to tackle all forms of social media, public speaking, or other means of publicity. Genre-specific conventions like Malice Domestic are a great way to promote your novel to a receptive audience.

 

Links:

1)      Malice Domestic – http://www.malicedomestic.org/

2)      Goodreads – https://www.goodreads.com/

3)      For more one hit novel wonders – http://listverse.com/2008/02/07/top-10-literary-one-hit-wonders/

4)      Stone Cold Dead – A Rock Shop Mystery : Amazon – http://amzn.to/18R60gQ

Tattered Cover independent bookstore – http://bit.ly/IC97SG Barnes and Noble – http://bit.ly/1bFVaQz

 

 

Biography:StoneColdDeadFront_blog

Catherine Dilts writes amateur sleuth mysteries set in the Colorado mountains. In her debut novel Stone Cold Dead – A Rock Shop Mystery, business is as dead as a dinosaur, but when Morgan Iverson finds the body of a Goth teen on a hiking trail, more than just the family rock shop could become extinct. Catherine works as an environmental scientist, and plays at heirloom vegetable gardening, camping, and fishing. Her short fiction appears in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine. Visit her at http://www.catherinedilts.com/