The Best Book I Never Wrote by Nancy Lynn Jarvis

Nancy200x300Nancy Lynn Jarvis finally acknowledged she was having too much fun writing to ever sell another house, so she let her license lapse in May of 2013, after her twenty-fifth anniversary in real estate.After earning a BA in behavioral science from San Jose State University, she worked in the advertising department of the San Jose Mercury News. A move to Santa Cruz meant a new job as a librarian and later a stint as the business manager for Shakespeare/Santa Cruz at UCSC. She invites you to take a peek into the real estate world through the stories that form the backdrop of her Regan McHenry mysteries. Real estate details and ideas come from Nancy’s own experiences.

Links:

Amazon Author Page for all books http://tinyurl.com/nkjcg2d

     Goodreads http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2918242.Nancy_Lynn_Jarvis

Facebook http://www.facebook.com/ReganMcHenryRealEstateMysteries?ref=ts

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Right out of the box I have a question for your readers, PJ. How long do you have to wait before you should categorize a book as “The Best Book I Never Wrote?”

 

Readers, if you’re like me, you eavesdrop in restaurants and store checkout lines and make up storylines that incorporate what you hear. I recently went into the ladies restroom at The Mission Ranch Inn (owned by Clint Eastwood) in Carmel. The two bathroom stalls were occupied by friends who were chatting back and forth as they attended to business.

 

“…that’s when I realized I was locked in the bathroom. I pounded on the door, but, of course no one came because they were closing down for the night. There was one small window to the outside and I managed to get it open, but I couldn’t see what was below it or where it lead. Now, I’m small…”

“That you are.”

“so I figured I could squeeze through it. The only thing was I had on a brand new outfit—not an inexpensive one, I might add—of cream colored pants and a matching sweater that I didn’t want to get dirty or worse, ruin, so I took them off.”

 

The two women came out of their stalls. I’d guess they were plus-or-minus eighty years old. The tale-teller continued as they washed their hands, “I couldn’t decide if I should go through the window head first or feet first…”

 

That’s when they left. Well, maybe not a book, but a darn good short story.

 

I don’t have a traditional bucket list, I have a book bucket list so long I’ll need to live to a hundred-and-sixty if I have any hope of writing through it, and it grows almost daily. Yesterday I got a new idea from a friend that I’m sure would make a fabulous book.

 

My friend is a private investigator and a source of many great book ideas and details, a couple that I’ve used, and three that I will at some point use in my Regan McHenry Real Estate Mysteries series. Mostly she finds people and has solved birth parent mysteries, inheritance mysteries, and even a transgender…no I can’t tell you any more about that one because it’s one of her stories that I will use soon.

 

She’s been trying her hand writing a book with chapters for various cases she’s solved. She’ a great story teller, especially when she describes how her mind works as she solves mysteries. I want to read her book! The problem is, she’s bogged down and despairs that she will ever finish it. She says her problem is that she always has theories about what led the people she investigates to do what they did, a back story, if you will. She’d like to talk about her theories, but doesn’t want to write fiction.

 

I suggested—OK begged—her to collaborate with me. She could write a chapter of detective details and I could write a fictional short story to explain them based on her theories. Unfortunately, she’s not on board, which is awful because I’m convinced the book would be fascinating. I haven’t given up hope, but at the moment a collaborative effort with her seems like the best book I never wrote.

 

It’s disappointing, too, because I’ve found writer friends helping one another yields great promotional benefits. I edited a collaborative cookbook called Cozy Food: 128 Cozy Mystery Writers Share Their Favorite Recipes. It was great fun, we all benefited from mutual marketing, and the book continues to introduce readers to new favorite authors even two years after its release.

 

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A Neighborly Killing by Nancy Lynn Jarvis

Waking up to gunshots and discovering the body of their neighbor just outside their bedroom door is bad enough, but when the Coroner rules the FrontCoverdeath a suicide, Realtors Regan McHenry and her husband Tom Kiley don’t believe it for a minute. Never mind what the physical evidence says; they heard their dead neighbor arguing with someone in the moments preceding his death.

 

What really happened has become more than just a mystery they’d like to solve because the circumstances of their dead neighbor’s past keep interfering with their present and putting them in danger.

 

Philadelphia story by Laura Elvebak

LElvebakLaura Elvebak sometimes feels she has led several lives, but throughout the years her passion for reading and writing never faltered. Before the twenty-something years she worked for lawyers and oil and gas executives, she held a variety of occupations, including working as waitress and even as a go-go dancer in the late sixties in Philadelphia. Born in North Dakota and raised in Los Angeles and San Francisco, she settled in Houston after living in parts of New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia and Florida. She is happily unmarried after six attempts with men who would make fascinating characters in books but didn’t succeed as husband material. Her standalone thriller, The Flawed Dance, came out from Black Opal Books, on July 11, 2015.

 

I had two dreams growing up. I wanted to be a writer and see my words printed like the books I read. I dreamed up stories every night as if they were on a movie screen. Previews first, please. When I wasn’t reading books by the fireplace at home with my grandparents, I was dancing to the music on the radio.

I was raised with classical music. My father played classical violin. My grandmother would accompany him on the piano. After my mother died, I lived with my grandparents in Los Angeles. They introduced a new world for me with books and music that opened my mind and filled my heart.

When I turned eight I went to live with my father and stepmother. They enrolled me in ballet lessons and took me to see such performances as Swan Lake and The Firebird. I imagined an entire ballet whenever I heard music. I was going to be the next premier ballerina. When I wasn’t dancing, I would write stories. When I thought they were good, I sent them off to the Ladies Home Journal and McCalls, with visions of making my fortune. Of course, the handwritten pages were returned.

Then I grew up and the world changed. I did not become the world famous ballerina, but dancing came as naturally as eating. In order to eat on a FlawedDancedaily basis, I became a go-go dancer. To keep sane, I filled notebooks with stories.

Forty years later I knew I had to write about those five years in Philadelphia. Not a memoir, but the fictionalized story of Erin Matthews, who makes bad decisions and worse choices after running from her much older lover. Add in murder, ruthless mob guys, Atlantic City in the late sixties, racial tension, guilt, sex, and go-go dancers in the demimonde world of entertainers and hustlers, and you have A Flawed Dance, where Erin learns the difference between ballet and go-go dancing.

 

 

Readers, where do you get your stories? Do you have a checkered past? Or do you make it all up in your head? Or a combination of both?

An apology

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I went to the doctor on June 18, expecting to come home with a handful of prescription oral antibiotics then go right back to work. Instead, I was whisked away and promptly admitted to the local hospital, repeatedly reassured that it was the fastest cure for the cellulitis that afflicted my legs. That might have been true in theory, but in actuality, the  diuretics they gave me along with the antibiotics caused my kidneys to start to fail. They’d already been attacked by Lupus and didn’t have far to go. Soooooooo current treatment was suspended in favor of Plan B. Start dialysis.

Now here it is August and it’s really been a bumpy road. Dialysis is no more fun than it was the first time, but it is needed and tolerable. Physical therapy has been grueling and I’m still enduring it three times a week.

Keeping up with my work was still a high priority during those weeks, as it is now, so some things slipped to the side, this blog being one of them. I didn’t intend to neglect it, or the wonderful authors who often share guest posts here. I simply ran out of hours and fell sadly behind. I ask that you accept my apology and continue to be patient as I get things moving here again. I promise to share some wonderful new authors and book news with you in coming weeks!

 

PJ

Who’s been a Bad Boy? by Lise McClendon

LiseThere are many ways to skin a cat – and promote your writing. One popular way is to create a limited edition box set and price it so low that you’re almost giving it away. The point is to get it into digital readers, not to make money. You can box up your own novels, by series or whatever theme you can conjure up, but joining with other authors can really ease the promotion burden. The idea is that cross-pollination of readers will grow all gardens. You bloom, I bloom, we all bloom with a bigger readership.

 

A few months ago I was asked to join five other authors to put together a box set. My invitation came through an English writer I knew mostly through social media. I had read her book, written about it, became Facebook friends, corresponded, and even met her last year at Bouchercon, the big mystery convention. But I didn’t know the other authors at all, two Americans, a Brit, and an Irish writer.

 

My English friend, Helen Smith, writes comic mysteries and a lot more. Having read her books, and gotten the invitation, I knew we would be compatible. The other authors write a little comedy, a little romance, a little mystery. The theme of the box set was to be “British Bad Boys,” and encompassed humor, mystery, and romance. I had in mind to use my thriller, PLAN X, about a British professor in Montana who is badly injured in a campus explosion.  The story revolves around policewoman and Iraq vet, Cody Byrne, who is tasked to find the professor’s next of kin. The mission turns out harder than it should be, and gets a little twisted when it’s discovered the professor asked several colleagues to hide old documents that look suspiciously like a lost Shakespeare play. Lots of thrills, intrigue, murder, and MI5.

 

But comedy? Funny stuff? Hmmm. I love to laugh but wasn’t sure this novel fit the bill. To their credit the authors only asked: “There’s sarcasm, right?” Well, I thought, I certainly hope so. What’s life or fiction without a little snark? I was in.

 

Several of the authors had been in sets together before and knew the ropes. They had a formatter and cover designer lined up. The six of us discussed the design of the cover, and the sexy quotient of the bad boy on the cover. Our ring-leader, Florida author Barbara Silkstone, kept us up to date and on task.

 

The box set went into production.  Some of us wrote original stories. All of us wrote blurbs. We okayed the cover and sent it all into the formatter. BRITISH-BAD-BOYS-Box-Set-KOBOAnd voila! The box set of British Bad Boys sprung on the world on Easter. So happy to be in the talented company of Helen Smith, Barbara Silkstone, Gerry McCullough, Anne R. Allen, and Sibel Hodge.

 

The e-book box set is just 99 cents. Pocket change! We hope readers are tempted by the bargain. The box set will be available through the summer only. That’s key, the limited time edition. Most of us are also selling our novels or stories individually but we hope this exposure to more readers will help all our novels get more readers. Because that’s what it’s all about, right?

  • • •

 

Amazon: http://smarturl.it/britishbadboys

Nook: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/british-bad-boys-barbara-silkstone/1121689967?ean=2940151581530

KOBO: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/british-bad-boys-1

Shop at an independent bookstore that sells KOBO e-books,

like Mysterious Galaxy: http://www.mystgalaxy.com/ebook/1230000341172

Partnering in writing by Janet Lynn

BW Janet Bill 01Someone once came up with the following equation for successfully completing a novel: Butt + chair = book.  After publishing eight novels I can attest to the truthfulness of this equation! Though a simple formula, it is the best way to get a novel competed.

My husband, Will Zeilinger, also a published author and I joined “talents” and wrote a 1950’s noir murder mystery…Slivers of Glass. Noir is something I always wanted to write but couldn’t  figure out how to get into a guy’s head effectively. When I mentioned this to my husband he said, “So let’s do one together.” Hence this partnership began.

People warned us that it would tarnish our marriage. They insisted it wouldn’t work. Concerned, we took a business approach and set rules of professionalism, respect and overall patience.

Here are some things we did to make it work:

  1. Meetings We set regular meetings and met weekly or monthly depending on where we were in the manuscript and PR. We made sure we had a definite beginning and end time for all meetings.
  2. Agenda Our meetings ALWAYS included an agenda to keep the discussions on track, review our deadlines, and where the book should be at each point in the journey.
  3. Respect difference of opinions. It’s important to check your ego at the door when meeting about the book or project. No one on the team is 100% right or wrong at all times. Find a medium you can agree to.
  4. A sense of humor Laughter can decrease anxiety when self doubt hits. Like brainstorming, it’d difficult to do it by yourself or with a pet!
  5. And the most important things, we agreed and practiced the above equation.

The result-SLIVERS OF GLASS and a wonderful partnering experience for the both of us.  And by the way, we are still married!!

website: http://www.janetlynnauthor.com

Ambrosiaphoto

A very popular dessert in the 1950’s, served at the famous Coconut Grove Night Club in Los Angeles. The “Grove” was known for its great cuisine. The Coconut Grove is featured in one of the scenes in Slivers of Glass, a Noir murder Mystery.

 

Ingredients

2 oranges or tangerines

Sugar

2 bananas

Shredded coconut, unsweetened

 

Direction

Peel the oranges or tangerines, pull the pieces apart; cut the pieces across the middle. Peel the bananas and cut them into thin slices.

Cover the bottom of the bowl with orange pieces. Sprinkle 1-2 teaspoons of sugar over the oranges (depending on the sweetness of the oranges/tangerines). Put some banana slices on oranges, and then sprinkle a little coconut over bananas.

Do the same thing for the next layer, first the oranges, sugar, bananas and coconut. Make more layers, using all the fruit.

Sprinkle coconut on top. Cover with plastic wrap, refrigerate for 1 hour. Serves 3-4

 

Slivers of Glass

By

Janet Elizabeth LynnSlivers_of_Glass_sml_cover

And

Will Zeilinger

 

Summary

Southern California 1955: the summer Disneyland opened, but even “The Happiest Place on Earth” couldn’t hide the smell of dirty cops, corruption and murder.

The body of a woman thought to be killed three years earlier is found behind a theater in Hollywood.  Movie stuntman Skylar Drake, a former LAPD detective, is dragged into the investigation. He can make no sense of the crime until he discovers a dirty underworld and unearths deep-seated… greed.

The hunt takes Drake to places he’d never expect.  He’s anxious to close this case and get back to his business in L.A., but he’s constantly haunted by the memory of his wife and young daughter, killed in a mysterious house fire.

With more than enough dirty cops, politicians and crime bosses to go around, Drake can trust no one including Martin Card, the cop assigned to work with him.

Buy link: website:

website: www.janetlynnauthor.com

www.willzeilingerauthor.com

 

Excerpt

There were a dozen other things I could’ve been doing besides standing in line at the drug store listening to Bill Haley’s “Rock Around the Clock” piped in overhead.  Though, it was a treat to watch the cashier move behind the counter in her form-fitting white smock. I shook my head and plopped a tube of Pepsodent and a couple of toothbrushes on the pharmacy counter.

She looked up and said, “That will be seventy-five cents, Mr. Drake.”

I dug in my pocket and dropped three quarters in her hand, “Thank you, Miss Abernathy.” She placed my items in a small white paper bag and folded over the top. “Here you are, and quit calling me that.  My name is Emily. Anyway, this should keep you smiling brightly. I only wish I could see yours sometime.”

In all the times I’ve walked to this drug store, I couldn’t remember a day she didn’t smile at me. Too bad there was a ‘y’ at the end of Emily’s name. Women with names like Sandy, Cathy or Abby were bad luck. Those ‘y’  women were always trouble and it would be dangerous to get mixed up with another one now.

“Thanks,” I tipped my hat, “When I have something to smile about, I might just show you.” I knew Emily pretty well since this place was only a couple of blocks from my apartment, an apartment I lived in because a fire took my home along with my beautiful wife Claire and Ellen my little girl.

As I turned to leave, I winked at the two little old ladies behind me.  They stepped back and stared as if I’d just sneezed in their faces. I turned and waved goodbye to Emily only to see her pointing behind me in horror. I followed her gaze and saw a dark green car hurtling toward us – right through the huge windows at the front of the store! The gigantic crash at my back sent shelves, boxes and cans hurtling in our direction. I turned around as glass, smoke and debris seemed to explode in a cloud around us. At that moment my training from the Marine Corps took over. I instinctively swept up the two ladies and Emily and pushed them to the back of the store. The other customers ran screaming out the huge opening where the storefront windows used to be. I shielded the women against the back wall with my body all the while knowing that my weight could suffocate them, but what else could I do? The ceiling could come down on us at any moment. I held them against the wall while listening to my heart pound.  Slowly the tinkle of glass subsided and I released them. Tiny slivers of glass and wood had embedded themselves in my sweater and trousers. “You’d better be careful,” One of the little old women chirped, “Your backside looks like a pin cushion.  Best not to sit down for a while.”

 

Bio:

JANET ELIZABETH LYNN was born in Queens, New York and raised in Long Island, until she was 12 years old. Her family escaped the freezing winters and hurricanes for the warmth and casual lifestyle of Southern California.

Janet has always wanted to write and made it a quest to write a novel. Ten years later, with much blood and sweat, her first murder mystery novel, South of the Pier, was published in 2011. She has since written seven more mysteries. Miss Lynn has traveled to the far reaches of the planet for work and for pleasure, collecting wonderful memories, new found friends and a large basket of shampoo and conditioner samples from hotels.

At one time Janet was an Entertainment Editor for a newspaper in Southern California.

Contact info:

Book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4-KRRAbyUA

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/janet.lynn.5477

LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/home?trk=nav_responsive_tab_home

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JanetLynn4

Blog: http://janetelizabethlynnauthor.blogspot.com/

e-mail: janet_lynn51@yahoo.com

website: http://www.janetlynnauthor.com

 

WILL ZEILINGER  has been writing for over twelve years. During that time, he took novel writing classes and joined writer’s groups, but what has helped the most are published authors who mentor, encourage, critique  and listen to him while he continued to learn the craft.  At the time of this writing, Will has published three novels (Ebooks.) The Naked Groom,  Something’s Cooking at Dove Acres, and The Final Checkpoint (also in print).

As a youth he lived overseas with his family. As an adult he traveled the world. Will lives in Southern California with his wife Janet Elizabeth Lynn, who is also an author. Will says that finding time to write while life happens is a challenge.

 

Contact info:

Twitter:  @Will_Zeilinger

Facebook:  www.facebook.com/wzeilinger

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/william-zeilinger/15/48/9a7/

website: http://www.willzeilingerauthor.com

blog: http://www.booksbywilzeilinger.blogspot.com

The Great American Novel by Robin Tidwell

That’s the goal of every author, right? But sometimes we get distracted.

Back in, oh, 1997, I got my first computer, a hand-me-down from my sister. I couldn’t even get online with that thing, but I kept trying. Finally, familyphotoknowing I wanted to write a book, my husband bought me a used machine and I learned how to operate it—even went to some message boards and met a few people that I still keep in touch with.

But no book was written.

I outgrew that computer pretty quickly, and snagged a brand new, custom-built job—still no book. Over the next ten years, I thought about that Great American Novel, but I didn’t actually start putting pen to paper, so to speak, until 2005.

Oh, happy day! My husband was thrilled, kept the kids away, took over the cooking and cleaning. And I wrote.

A whopping 1000 words.

I mentioned distractions, right? Well, we had five kids between us, and I ran our various businesses, and then I went back to college. Again. And I kept upgrading my computer system, and wow, have things changed or what?

But still no book.

Recycled coverOne night, January 31, 2012, to be exact, I had a dream. The next morning, and over the next six months, I wrote a book; dystopian fiction—REDUCED. That was followed by REUSED, RECYCLED, and, coming in March 2015, God willing and the creek don’t rise (actually, rising creeks are a hazard around here), REPEAT will be, um, released.

Still no Great American Novel.

I found the file today. It was under “book.doc.” Nice, huh? As an author and publisher, I have many, many files with the word “book” in them. Many. It took me a 30 solid minutes of searching and clicking. But it’s there—all 1000 words.

Wow. Only 80,000 or so to go . . .

After I read it, and managed not to cringe, much, I remembered that I’d introduced a few more characters—so where did they go?? Fortunately, they had unique names, old-fashioned ones, so I searched again. Found another file: book (autosaved).doc.

Impressive, yes? I really need to give this at least a working title . . .

Maybe it’s right that things turned out like this. Maybe I needed all those years to gain more experience, more skill. Maybe I’ll get it written. Soon. Ish.

It’s epic—in the truest sense of the meaning of that word—twists, turns, parallels, flashbacks; it covers five generations of women in one family. History, love, war. And after finding that second file, well, I’m up to nearly 3000 words.

I might even be able to keep some of them.

And while I have, as yet, no title, and no synopsis, it does have a genre: family friction. No, that’s not a typo. It’s a new genre—and this may be the first book categorized as such. You can thank my mother . . . she knows!

 

RTidwellRobin’s writing career began at the age of eight, when her grandmother insisted she read Gone with the Wind before taking her to see the movie. gwtwInspired by Margaret Mitchell, she began scribbling little booklets of stories, and was the editor of her elementary school newspaper and a columnist in high school. She submitted a short story to Seventeen magazine and was promptly rejected, but still keeps a copy of the manuscript in her desk.

Robin has worked as a snack bar cook, a salad prepper, a camp counselor, a waitress, a receptionist, a housekeeper, a freelancer, an editor, and an employment consultant and manager. She’s also been in car sales, skin care sales, cookware sales, advertising sales, and MLM. She’s owned and operated an entrepreneurial conglomerate, a cleaning service, an old-time photography studio, a bookstore, and a publishing house.

Six years ago, Robin and her husband Dennis moved back to St. Louis, after many years in Columbia, Sedalia, Colorado Springs, Durango, and Granbury and Tolar, Texas. They live with their youngest son, a dog, a cat, and a new puppy. www.robintidwell.com

Website URL:  http://www.RobinTidwell.com

Blog URL:  RobinTidwell.Wordpress.com